Vagal Nerve Stimulator

Vagus nerve stimulation is a procedure that sends electrical impulses into your brain in an effort to improve depression symptoms.

About this Surgery

Used to treat: Seizure Disorder

Vagus nerve stimulation is a procedure that sends electrical impulses into your brain in an effort to decrease the seizure frequency and duration. Sometimes called vagal nerve stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation is one of a few newer brain-stimulation methods designed to treat chronic depression when other treatments haven't worked.

There's one vagus nerve on each side of your body. Each nerve runs from your brainstem through your neck and down to your chest and abdomen.

With vagus nerve stimulation, a device called a pulse generator is surgically implanted in your chest. A wire threaded under your skin connects the pulse generator to the left vagus nerve in your neck. The pulse generator sends out electrical signals along the vagus nerve to your brain. These signals affect mood centers of your brain, which may improve depression symptoms.

[Source: Mayo Clinic]

Please keep in mind that all treatments and outcomes are specific to the individual patient. Results may vary. Complications, such as infection, blood loss, and bowel or bladder problems are some of the potential adverse risks of surgery. Please consult your physician for a complete list of indications, warnings, precautions, adverse events, clinical results and other important medical information.