Posterior Fusion

While fusing two vertebrae together may limit bending and twisting of the trunk, many patients feel an improvement in range of motion because their pain has been reduced.

About this Surgery

Used to treat: Spondylolisthesis (Lumbar), Spondylolisthesis (Cervical)

Following a discectomy, laminectomy or other surgery that involves removing portions of one or more vertebrae to relieve pressure on the spinal cord and nerves, fusion instrumentation and bone grafting are used to stabilize the spine. Metal or non-metal instrumentation is put in place to hold the vertebrae together as the bone graft grows and fuses the vertebrae. These implants include rods, plates and screws that are left in place after the surgery. Bone grafts may be placed on the outside of the two vertebrae or between the vertebrae (interbody).

While fusing two vertebrae together may limit bending and twisting of the trunk, many patients feel an improvement in range of motion because their pain has been reduced.

 

 

 

Please keep in mind that all treatments and outcomes are specific to the individual patient. Results may vary. Complications, such as infection, blood loss, and bowel or bladder problems are some of the potential adverse risks of surgery. Please consult your physician for a complete list of indications, warnings, precautions, adverse events, clinical results and other important medical information.