Microvascular Decompression

Microvascular decompression involves separating the nerve root and blood vessels with a small Teflon pattie so they are no longer in contact.

About this Surgery

Used to treat: Hemi-facial Spasm, Trigeminal Neuralgia

Microvascular decompression involves separating the nerve root and blood vessels with a small Teflon pattie so they are no longer in contact.

During the surgery, your doctor makes an incision behind the ear on the side of your pain to access your facial or trigeminal nerve. Any artery in contact with the nerve root is directed away from the nerve, and the surgeon places a pad between the nerve and the artery.

Decompression can successfully eliminate or reduce symptoms most of the time, but they can recur in some people. While the surgery has a high success rate, it also carries risks. There are small chances of decreased hearing, facial weakness, facial numbness, double vision and even a stroke or death.

Please keep in mind that all treatments and outcomes are specific to the individual patient. Results may vary. Complications, such as infection, blood loss, and bowel or bladder problems are some of the potential adverse risks of surgery. Please consult your physician for a complete list of indications, warnings, precautions, adverse events, clinical results and other important medical information.