Balloon Gangliolysis

In percutaneous balloon gangliolysis of the trigeminal nerve, your doctor inserts a hollow needle through your face and into an opening in the base of your skull.

About this Surgery

Used to treat: Trigeminal Neuralgia

In percutaneous balloon gangliolysis of the trigeminal nerve, your doctor inserts a hollow needle through your face and into an opening in the base of your skull. Then, a thin, flexible tube (catheter) with a balloon on the end is threaded through the needle. The balloon is inflated with enough pressure to damage the nerve and block pain signals.

This procedure successfully controls pain in most people, at least for a while. Most people undergoing balloon compression experience some facial numbness, and some may experience temporary or permanent weakness of the muscles used to chew.

Please keep in mind that all treatments and outcomes are specific to the individual patient. Results may vary. Complications, such as infection, blood loss, and bowel or bladder problems are some of the potential adverse risks of surgery. Please consult your physician for a complete list of indications, warnings, precautions, adverse events, clinical results and other important medical information.