Aneurysm Clipping/Coiling

If the aneurysm has ruptured, clips may be placed at the base of the aneurysm to seal it off from the parent vessel. An aneurysm coiling is another procedure which can treat an aneurysm and is less invasive than surgical clipping.

About this Surgery

Used to treat: Aneurysm

Aneurysm Clipping

The decision to treat an unruptured aneurysm depends on a number of factors, including the type, location and size of the aneurysm, your age and your general health. Most unruptured aneurysms that are less than 5 millimeters across—about the size of a pencil eraser—have a relatively low chance of rupturing.  If you have a large aneurysm that has not burst, especially if it is pressing against brain tissue and causing symptoms such as headaches or impaired vision, you are more likely to need treatment. If the aneurysm has ruptured, clips may be placed at the base of the aneurysm to seal it off from the parent vessel.

 

 

Aneurysm Coiling

This procedure is less invasive than surgical clipping. An interventional surgeon inserts a hollow plastic tube (catheter) into an artery, usually in your groin, and threads it through your body to the aneurysm. Using a guide wire, the doctor then feeds a spiral of soft platinum wire through the catheter and into the aneurysm. The wire coils up inside the blood vessel or aneurysm, blocking the blood flow.

ACSN - Brain Surgery - Endovascular Embolization

 

 

Both procedures pose risks. The endovascular coil is less invasive and has a quicker recovery time, but it also has a higher risk of re-bleeding, so additional procedures may be necessary. The surgical clip procedure may be a better choice for people who have larger or more-complicated aneurysms.

Please keep in mind that all treatments and outcomes are specific to the individual patient. Results may vary. Complications, such as infection, blood loss, and bowel or bladder problems are some of the potential adverse risks of surgery. Please consult your physician for a complete list of indications, warnings, precautions, adverse events, clinical results and other important medical information.